What do you love about your city?

Poetry

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Lindsay Zier-Vogel has written many love letters to many cities over the years.

Toronto love poems:

501 Streetcar

I love that you stretch the width
of the city,
and offer windows of lake,
and the conversations of strangers.

High Park Avenue

I love you
where the trees are bigger
than arms can reach
and porches spread
the width of houses.

Ward’s Island

The far side of the water
where the city disappears
and shoulders are sun-warm
even when the lake
is edged in night.

Cherry Bomb window on Roncesvalles

I love that you are the most perfect
window in an often
imperfect afternoon,
fingers wrapped around glass
like careful ribs.

The Beaches

There is a point where the lake stretches
further than eyes can make sense of,
turning the blue into forever.

The AGO

I love that you turn around yourself
and turn me into a snail,
inside the most perfect home.

The Wolf Sculpture in Trinity Bellwoods Park

I love that you howl
between the game of tag
and the picnic blanket,
marking summer
after summer
after summer.

Union Station

I would fall in love
with you again in Edmonton,
and Sudbury,
and Halifax,
and every other city
carved east to west
into this stone ceiling.

The Bulk Store on Baldwin St.

I love that in front of the
barrels of figs and currants
and pistachios,
you twist
salted cashews into a waxed
paper cone
(a gift).

The Cob Structure in Dufferin Grove Park

Love is a small
not quite house
in the middle of
the park
we used to sit in,
and watch the leaves
turn wind into
tornadoes.

Grace St.

Love happens on a street
named after a long ago sister,
when the sun dips below
the streetcar wires
and even the sidewalk
turns orange, pink,
a deepening purple.

Richview Memorial Cemetery

I love that you
are a misplaced triangle,
ignoring the roar
of highway traffic
and filling instead
with flowers.

CBC’s Metro Morning

Tangled in midnight sheets
cheeks sleep-creased,
I love you first thing,
before my voice has found itself,
and before my feet
know the weight of
the morning.

Copyright Lindsay Zier-Vogel